Journal of Health Care and Research
Journal of Health Care and Research [ISSN: 2582-8967]
Journal of Health Care and Research

About Journal of Health Care and Research [JHCR]

Journal of Health Care and Research is an open access international journal publishing original peer-reviewed research articles. The Journal is a Tri-annually Publication. It is dedicated to the production of commitments in all fields of exploratory and connected inquires about health sciences. The editors welcome unique commitments that have not been published and are not under thought somewhere else.

Papers acknowledged for publication are double-blind refereed to ensure academic integrity. This Journal endeavors to give the most happening and best research in the field of health sciences.

The principle point is to build a platform and communicate with researchers and scientists by publishing unique research, audits, case reports, Opinions, short correspondences and editorials, and so on. This Journal is devoted to different disciplines of Health sciences.

Submit manuscript as an e-mail attachment to the Editorial Office at healthcareandresearch@asplhealthcare.com

Why Publish With Us

  • All the published articles are open access which means it’s free to access from anywhere in the world.
  • We offer fast publication while providing rigorous peer review to maintain the integrity of information.
  • Each article will be published under a Creative Commons license and authors are the copyright holder.
  • We are committed to the highest standards of peer review.
  • We’re proud of the impact and influence this journal have – from citations to social media shares.
  • We’re committed to promoting your work as widely as we can and providing as much visibility and exposure for your article as possible.

Most Recent Articles


Prevalence and Predictors of Influenza Vaccination Among Adults with High-Risk Conditions, United States, 2019
Original Article | J Health Care and Research. 2021 Aug 02;2(3):137-45 | DOI: 10.36502/2021/hcr.6199
Prevalence and Predictors of Influenza Vaccination Among Adults with High-Risk Conditions, United States, 2019

Author(s): Saji Saraswathy Gopalan*, Devi Kalyan Mishra, Ashis Kumar Das

Abstract

Introduction: Influenza could be associated with illnesses, severe complications, hospitalizations, and deaths among adults with high-risk medical conditions. Influenza vaccination reduces the risks and complications associated with influenza infection in high-risk conditions. We assessed the prevalence and predictors of influenza vaccination in a national sample of adults with high-risk medical conditions in the United States.
Methods: Using the nationally representative National Health Interview Survey of 2019, we estimated the prevalence of influenza vaccination among adults with high-risk conditions. We tested the associations between receipt of vaccination and socio-demographic predictors.
Results: Out of 15,258 adults with high-risk conditions, 56% reported receiving an influenza vaccine over the previous 12 months. Multivariable regressions show that respondents from older age groups, females, married, higher annual family income, having health insurance and those with more than two high-risk conditions are more likely to receive the vaccine. However, adults from non-Hispanic Black race/ethnicity and living in the Southern census region are less likely to receive the vaccination. Education levels and living in a metro show no associations with vaccination status.
Conclusions: State authorities and providers have important roles in sensitizing and reminding individuals with high-risk conditions to receive timely vaccination. Affordability needs to be enhanced for influenza vaccination including better insurance coverage and reduced co-payment.

Journal of Health Care and Research [ISSN: 2582-8967]
Case Report | J Health Care and Research. 2021 Jul 19;2(2):133-36 | DOI: 10.36502/2021/hcr.6198
A Case of Neutropenia Associated with COVID-19

Author(s): Sherif Elkattawy*, Sarah Ayad, Neil Williams, Archanna Radakrishnan, Justin Joy, Omar Elkattawy, Kirolos Gergis, Steven J Narbut

Abstract

SARS-CoV2 is a novel respiratory viral illness responsible for a global pandemic that started in the late 2019. Signs and symptoms being non-specific, clinicians relied on a constellation of abnormal results obtained from clinical investigations and imaging to diagnose the illness prior to the availability of widespread, timely testing. One proposed metric was the increased neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR) observed in patients suffering from COVID-19. Those with higher ratios were generally admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) with detrimental outcomes. Neutrophilia and lymphocytopenia were common occurrences in COVID-19 cases worldwide, even among those not severe enough to be in ICU. Here, we present a case of a 41-year-old SARS-CoV2 positive male who initially presented with fever, but then developed neutropenia. It is unknown whether his decreased neutrophil count was attributable current medications, an additional underlying infection, or whether it was due to the virus itself. Review of the literature did not yield any similar cases.

Journal of Health Care and Research
Original Article | J Health Care and Research. 2021 Jul 15;2(2):126-32 | DOI: 10.36502/2021/hcr.6197
A Few Words about Health Care Law

Author(s): Siniša Franjić*

Abstract

Every person has the right to health care and the opportunity to achieve the highest possible level of health. Every person is obliged to take care of their health. No one should endanger the health of other people. Every person is obliged to provide first aid to an injured or sick person in accordance with their knowledge and abilities and to provide them with access to the nearest medical institution. Every citizen has the right to health care while respecting the highest possible standard of human rights and values, i.e. the right to physical and mental integrity and security of his personality, as well as respect for his moral, cultural, religious and philosophical beliefs.

Journal of Health Care and Research
Commentary | J Health Care and Research. 2021 Jul 02;2(2):122-25 | DOI: 10.36502/2021/hcr.6196
Perspectives on Sarcopenia and Protein Intake in Aged and Diabetic Patients

Author(s): Hiroshi Bando*

Abstract

The relationship among sarcopenia, protein intake, elderly, and diabetes has been in discussion. The Asian Working Group for Sarcopenia (AWGS) 2019 has revised the content by emphasizing the 5-time chair stand test. For prevention and treatment of sarcopenia and frailty, continuous protein intake is required such as meat, eggs, tofu, and so on. Elderly aged >65 is recommended to take at least >1.0 g/kg weight of protein per day for preventing sarcopenia and frailty. Sodium/glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitors (SGLT2i) have been widely used. However, SGLT2i are advised not to provide the subjects who are elderly and/or with sarcopenia or senile syndrome.

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