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Should Women Consult Health Agencies in Matters of Birth Control and Contraception? | Abstract

➣ Original Article

➣ J Health Care and Research. 2020 Apr 20;1(2):28-37

Kraetschmer K1*

1Austrian American Medical Research Institute, Agnesgasse 11, 1090 Vienna, Austria

Corresponding Author: Kurt Kraetschmer, MD, PhD

Address: Austrian American Medical Research Institute, Agnesgasse 11, 1090 Vienna, Austria; Email: kurt.kraetschmer@aon.at

Received date: 26 February 2020; Accepted date: 08 April 2020; Published date: 20 April 2020

Abstract

Background and Aim: On the background of recent developments revealing the harmful effects of contraceptive devices which are recommended by health agencies the paper aims at analyzing publications and other information material emanating from these agencies. This analysis – guided by the bioethical principle of informed consent — focuses on flawed science, ambiguous language, and misleading data.

Method and Material: The method consists of collecting and analyzing information provided by health agencies for consumers inquiring about the safety and efficacy of contraceptive products. The material comprises documents, charts, leaflets and other publications emanating from the most authoritative and most frequently consulted health agencies, in particular those active in the US and European countries.

Results and Implications: As a result of the investigation women must be advised to consult only a selected number of health agencies, especially those which take into account findings of pharmacovigilance, pharmaceutical vigilance, and scholarly publications focusing on the safety of contraception. The implications from an economic perspective are the discontinuation of funding through taxpayer money for those health agencies which continue to disseminate flawed science and demonstrate incompetence in questions about the safety of contraception.

Citation: Kraetschmer K. Should Women Consult Health Agencies in Matters of Birth Control and Contraception? J Health Care and Research. 2020 Apr 20;1(2):28-37.

Copyright © 2020 Kraetschmer K. This is an open-access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Keywords: Birth Control; Contraception; Food and Drug Administration; Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; Planned Parenthood; Pharmacovigilance

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