Pattern of Consumption of Dietary and Herbal Supplements by Individuals with Non-Communicable Diseases During Covid-19 Pandemic in Nigeria | Abstract

Journal of Health Care and Research [ISSN: 2582-8967]

Journal of Health Care and Research | Asploro

ISSN: 2582-8967

Article Type: Original Research

DOI: 10.36502/2023/hcr.6216

J Health Care and Research. 2023 Mar 18;4(1):5-20

Bamgboye M. Afolabi1,2iD*, Susan A. Holdbrooke1iD, Oluwatosin O. Odubela1
1Department of Biochemistry and Nutrition, Nigerian Institute of Medical Research, 6 Edmond Crescent Yaba, Lagos State, Nigeria
2Health, Environment and Development Foundation, 18, Ogunfunmi Street, Surulere, Lagos State, Nigeria

Corresponding Author: Bamgboye M. Afolabi ORCID iD
Address: Department of Biochemistry and Nutrition, Nigerian Institute of Medical Research, 6 Edmond Crescent, Yaba, Lagos, Nigeria.
Received date: 15 January 2023; Accepted date: 11 March 2023; Published date: 18 March 2023

Citation: Afolabi BM, Holdbrooke SA, Odubela OO. Pattern of Consumption of Dietary and Herbal Supplements by Individuals with Non-Communicable Diseases During Covid-19 Pandemic in Nigeria. J Health Care and Research. 2023 Mar 18;4(1):5-20.

Copyright © 2023 Afolabi BM, Holdbrooke SA, Odubela OO. This is an open-access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium provided the original work is properly cited.

Keywords: Black Africans, Consumption, Covid-19, Dietary, Herbal, Micro-nutrients, Non-Communicable Diseases, Supplements

Abstract

Cognizance of the implication of Covid-19 pandemic on health and well-being resulted in an upsurge in use of several dietary and herbal supplements (DHS) for the prevention and/or prophylaxis against the new disease.
Objectives: To evaluate the pattern of DHS consumption among Nigerians with Non-Communicable Diseases (NCD) for the prevention and treatment of COVID-19.
Design: Cross-sectional questionnaire survey. Setting: Adolescents, and adults residing in Nigeria.
Participants: Participants with NCD (n = 165) from a larger study (n=645) were recruited from different geo-political zones and various ethnic groups.
Primary and Secondary Outcomes: Prevalence and determinants of the use of different DHS for the prevention and treatment of COVID-19 in Nigeria, and sources of information for DHS use.
Results: Hypertension was the most prevalent NCD (63.6%) in the study and both breast cancer and anxiety disorder were the least (0.6%). Overall, 75.2% of the respondents had less than 8 hours of sleep daily and almost all did not smoke cigarette at all. The proportion of male and female hypertensives who believed that dietary supplements are necessary during infectious disease outbreak such as Covid-19 was moderately high (55.2%), higher among asthmatics (65.0%), diabetes (68.4%), those with kidney disease (100.0%) and ulcer (83.3%). All or almost all the respondents with hypertension (96.2%), asthma (95.0%), diabetes (100.0%) and kidney disease (100.0%), consumed supplements more during Covid-19 pandemic in Nigeria. The proportion of those who consumed supplements more during the pandemic in Nigeria was higher among male (56.4%) than among the female (43.6%) hypertensives, though the difference was not statistically significant (χ²=2.93, P-value=0.09). Vitamin C was the commonest vitamin taken by respondents with ulcer (83.3%), kidney disease (83.3%), diabetes (57.9%), asthma (50.0%), hypertension (48.6%) and the two respondents with breast cancer (1, 100.0%) and anxiety disorder (1, 100.0%) respectively. Calcium and zinc were the commonest minerals taken by respondents with ulcer (50.0%, 16.7%), diabetes (10.5%, 5.3%), asthma (30.0%, 10.0%) and hypertension (13.3%, 11.4%) respectively. High proportions (83.3%, 80.0%) of those with kidney disease and with asthma consumed DHS to maintain good health. Health workers were the dominant source of information for most on the use of supplements during Covid-19 pandemic in Nigeria.
Conclusions: The findings showed widespread use of DHS for the prevention and treatment of COVID-19 among persons with NCD. The use of DHS in this study was mainly guided by health workers with a marginal role of social media and Mass media. These findings call for a more robust consolidative tactic towards DHS to ensure its proper and safe use.

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