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Malaria Vaccine: The Role of Anopheline Saliva | Abstract

➣ Opinion Article

➣ J Health Care and Research. 2020 Mar 06;1(1):12-13

Hamad MNM1*

1Head of Medical Parasitology Department, Faculty of Medical Laboratory Sciences, Elsheikh Abdallah Elbadri University

Corresponding Author: Mosab Nouraldein Mohammed Hamad

Address: Head of Medical Parasitology Department, Faculty of Medical Laboratory Sciences, Elsheikh Abdallah Elbadri University, Sudan; E-mail: musab.noor13@gmail.com

Received date: 12 February 2020; Accepted date: 06 March 2020; Published date: 15 March 2020

Abstract

Malaria is one of the most spread parasitic diseases in the world, certainly, in tropical areas, it kills millions of people in those parts of the world chiefly pregnant ladies and young children.

Several efforts attempt to control malaria in these areas, but it faced by many factors such as wars, vector resistance to insecticides, poor knowledge and practice of health care workers and the absence of good communications between international organizations and policymakers in that regions.

Many attempts to produce an effective vaccine against malaria failed due to looking to the parasitic cycle from one side and regardless of the sexual cycle within Anopheles mosquito. I suggest that the key to the malaria vaccine starts from the salivary gland of Anopheles mosquito.

This paper is my word to heath organizations and medical research centers to support my view to gain a future vaccine to the malaria parasite.

Citation: Hamad MNM. Malaria Vaccine: The Role of Anopheline Saliva. J Health Care and Research. 2020 Mar 06;1(1):12-13.

Copyright © 2020 Hamad MNM. This is an open-access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Keywords: Malaria Parasite; Vaccine; Saliva

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