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Intrinsic Focal Electromagnetic Induction, a Mechanism of Neurological Symptoms | Abstract

➣ Review Article

➣ Asp Biomed Clin Case Rep. 2019 Sept 9;2(2):24-29

Rish BL1

13290 Homestead Club Drive, Apt. 5210, Winston Salem, NC 27103, USA

Corresponding Author: Berkley L. Rish, MD, FACS, FAANS

Address: 3290 Homestead Club Drive, Apt. 5210, Winston Salem, NC 27103, USA; E-mail: br44555@yahoo.com

Received date: 26 August 2019; Accepted date: 02 September 2019; Published date: 09 September 2019

Abstract

The physics of Electromagnetic Induction (EMI) is reviewed and applied to the anatomy and neurophysiology of the human body. The neuron, the primary cell of the nervous system, coexists with a myriad of vascular structures and would be susceptible to EMI. When the neuron’s electrical impulse, the action potential, traversing an axon with deficient myelin, intersects the electromotive fields of a blood vessel, a conductor, EMI could occur. By the laws of physics governing this phenomenon, a new current, inductance, would be produced and shared throughout the blood vessel and back into the axon source of the original current. Medical history and the study of physics support this phenomenon as the mechanism of the pain in trigeminal neuralgia, tic douloureux. Other neurological syndromes, such as seizures associated with arteriovenous malformations and causalgia seen after nerve injuries in the extremities may share this mechanism.

Citation: Rish BL. Intrinsic Focal Electromagnetic Induction, a Mechanism of Neurological Symptoms. Asp Biomed Clin Case Rep. 2019 Sept 9;2(2):24-29.

Copyright © 2019 Rish BL. This is an open-access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Key Words: Electromagnetic Induction; Neurological Syndromes; Trigeminal Neuralgia; Tic Douloureux; Seizures; Causalgia

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