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Cholelithiasis in Cystic Fibrosis Patients in a Tertiary Care Center in Saudi Arabia | Abstract

➣ Original Article

➣ Asp J Pediatrics Child Health. 2020 May 27;2(2):37-43

Banjar H1*, Al-Ghuneim L1, Al-Shammari A1, Al-Mulhim FA2, Al-Eid M3, Ghomraoui R4, Ghomraoui F5

1Department of Pediatrics, King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Centre, (KFSHRC), Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

2King Fahd University Hospital, (KFSHRC), Al Khobar, KSA

3Biostatistics, Epidemiology, and Scientific Computing Department, King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Centre, (KFSHRC), Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

4Elm University of Dentistry and Pharmacy, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

5Hospital: University at Buffalo-Catholic Health, Buffalo, New York, USA

Corresponding Author: Hanaa Banjar, MD, FRCPC ORCID ID

Address: Professor of Pediatrics, Al-Faisal University, Consultant Pediatric Pulmonology, Department of Pediatrics, (KFSHRC). P.O.Box. 3354, MBC-58, Riyadh 11211, Saudi Arabia; Tel: +9661-442-7761; Fax No: +966-1-442-7784, +966-503493022; E-mail: hanaa@kfshrc.edu.sa

Received date: 01 April 2020; Accepted date: 14 May 2020; Published date: 27 May 2020

Abstract

Introduction: Cholelithiasis has been reported in 12%-24% of Cystic Fibrosis (CF) patients, and is usually made up of cholesterol gallstones. These abnormalities are frequently asymptomatic and can include intra and extrahepatic ducts, gallbladder thickening and contraction, micro gallbladders, and cholelithiasis. Abdominal sonography is routinely used in order to detect these abnormalities.

Objectives: To obtain the prevalence of gall stones (Cholelithasis) in CF patients and its relation to other clinical, laboratory, radiological, and genetic data.

Methodology: A retrospective chart review as part of the CF registry data from the period 1st January 1984 – 1st June 2018. All confirmed CF the patients of all age groups that have US studies done were included in the study. Patients with positive gallstones or sludge were evaluated and discussed.

Results: A total of 391 confirmed CF patients were involved. Out of them, 252 patients had an abdominal ultrasound, 7 patients (3%) had gallstones on the abdominal US, 8 patients (3%) were revealed to have sludge and 237 patients (94%) had normal gallbladders. Pancreatitis was found in 4 patients (2%). 191 patients (76%) had pancreatic insufficiency.77 patients had follow up abdominal ultrasounds and 5 patients (7%) were found to have persistent gallstones, 4 patients (5%) had persistent sludge and 68 patients (88%) remained negative for gallstones. 2 patients required cholecystectomy.

Conclusion: Cholelithiasis is a common complication of CF disease; its incidence is more than the general population. Thus, we recommend that every CF patient get an ultrasonography study as part of liver disease screening to rule out any Gallbladder pathology.

Citation: Banjar H, Al-Ghuneim L, Al-Shammari A, Al-Mulhim FA, Al-Eid M, Ghomraoui R, Ghomraoui F. Cholelithiasis in Cystic Fibrosis Patients in a Tertiary Care Center in Saudi Arabia. Asp J Pediatrics Child Health. 2020 May 27;2(2):37-43.

Copyright © 2020 Banjar H, Al-Ghuneim L, Al-Shammari A, Al-Mulhim FA, Al-Eid M, Ghomraoui R, Ghomraoui F. This is an open-access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium provided the original work is properly cited.

Keywords: Cystic Fibrosis, Gallstone, Ultrasound, CFTR, Arab, Saudi Arabia, Cholelithiasis

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