Fundamental Sensory and Motor Neural Control in the Brain for the Musical Performance

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Fundamental Sensory and Motor Neural Control in the Brain for the Musical Performance

Hiroshi BANDO1,2*, Akiyo YOSHIOKA1, Yu NISHIKIORI1
1Shikoku Division of Integrative Medicine Japan (IMJ), Tokushima, Japan
2Tokushima University / Medical Research, Tokushima, Japan

Corresponding Author: Hiroshi BANDO, MD, PhD, FACP ORCID iD
Address: Tokushima University /Medical Research, Nakashowa 1-61, Tokushima 770-0943, Japan.
Received date: 10 February 2022; Accepted date: 18 March 2022; Published date: 26 March 2022

Citation: Bando H, Yoshioka A, Nishikiori Y. Fundamental Sensory and Motor Neural Control in the Brain for the Musical Performance. J Health Care and Research. 2022 Mar 26;3(1):7-10.

Copyright © 2022 Bando H, Yoshioka A, Nishikiori Y. This is an open-access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium provided the original work is properly cited.

Keywords: Integrative Medicine, Music Therapy, Superior Parietal Lobule, Sensory-Motor Transformations, Supplementary Motor Area, Piano-Playing

Abbreviations: IM: Integrative Medicine; MT: Music Therapy; SMA: Supplementary Motor Area

Abstract

Music has beneficial power physically and psychologically. Among Integrative Medicine (IM), music therapy (MT) has been useful, and authors have continued research for IM, MT, and piano-playing. Most pianists do not consider the movement of their fingers, because the memorized process is transformed into automatic action. The function may involve the neural signals from the superior parietal lobule to the primary motor area and dorsal premotor cortex, which is called the sensory-motor transformations. The supplementary motor area (SMA) in the frontal lobe seems to be involved in the function of beat-based timing, expression, and activity of musical behavior.